Home » Compliance Blog » Archives for Todd Cipperman

Author: Todd Cipperman

SEC Fines and Bars CCO for Ignoring Compliance Problems

The SEC fined and barred an adviser’s Chief Compliance Officer from acting in a compliance or supervisory capacity because of his failures to remedy compliance deficiencies.  The adviser hired an outside compliance consultant which recommended 59 compliance action items.  The SEC alleges that the CCO failed to address many of the issues raised including failures to (i) ensure a surprise audit pursuant to the custody rule, (ii) retain emails and other electronic records, and (iii) implement policies to protect customer information.  The SEC also charges the CCO with compliance program deficiencies including failures to update the compliance manual or conduct any meaningful annual review of the compliance program.  The firm’s president/principal was also censured and fined.

OUR TAKE: The SEC doesn’t often prosecute standalone (i.e. not dual hat) CCOs without an underlying client loss, but it will if the CCO ignores obvious compliance deficiencies of which he has notice.  This is what we call “compliance voodoo” i.e. an appearance of compliance infrastructure without an effective program.  This CCO had a compliance manual, did some quarterly testing, and hired a third party consultant.  But, neither the CCO nor the firm took any action to actually implement relevant procedures to address cited compliance deficiencies.

https://www.sec.gov/litigation/admin/2017/34-82397.pdf

Large Private Equity Firm to Pay $12.8 Million for Accelerated Portfolio Monitoring Fees

A large private equity firm agreed to pay over $12.8 Million in disgorgement, interest and fines for taking accelerated monitoring fees arising from the sale, IPO, and exit from portfolio companies.  The PE firm disclosed in the PPM that it would receive portfolio monitoring fees and disclosed in LP reports and the ADV that it received accelerated fees.  Nevertheless, the SEC faults the respondent for failing to disclose the accelerated fees before LPs committed capital and failed to submit the accelerated fees to the LP committee for approval.  The SEC accuses the firm of engaging in undisclosed conflicts of interest and failing to implement an adequate compliance program.

OUR TAKE: The SEC has attacked PE fees and expenses including portfolio monitoring fees, broken deal expenses, overhead costs, and consulting fees.  To avoid these issues, PE firms may want to re-think their business models and include all fees and expenses in a higher management fee and carried interest.

https://www.sec.gov/litigation/admin/2017/ia-4830.pdf

The Friday List: Our 2018 Predictions

Today, we offer our “Friday List,” an occasional feature summarizing a topic significant to investment management professionals interested in regulatory issues.  Our Friday Lists are an expanded “Our Take” on a particular subject, offering our unique (and sometimes controversial) perspective on an industry topic.

Every year, we offer our predictions on what will happen in the investment management regulatory world.  Last year, we went 4-6 (not great on a test, but pretty good in baseball).  We were right about the fiduciary rule, whistleblowers, state enforcement, and individual liability.  We missed on our predictions of regulatory changes and how the industry would respond to the increased demand for bonds.

The current uncertain regulatory environment has changed our hubris to humility.  Thus, it is with humble intent that we look forward to offer our 2018 predictions:

 

Predictions for the 2018 Regulatory Year

 

  1. More states will adopt fiduciary rules.  Nevada has already adopted a uniform fiduciary standard in the wake of the DoL’s delay.  We expect other states (e.g. California, New York, Connecticut) to follow.
  2. The SEC will propose a uniform fiduciary rule for retail advisers and broker-dealers.   Chairman Clayton has spoken publicly about the need for the SEC to wade into the fiduciary waters.  Expect a proposed rule this year.
  3. The SEC will commence significant cybersecurity enforcement actions.  The staff has done a sweep and issued guidance.  We have not yet seen significant enforcement actions.  We expect several this year.
  4. There will be cases alleging C-suite wrongdoing in private equity.  The SEC Enforcement Division has focused on the private equity industry for the last couple of years.  Given their interest in prosecuting senior executives to deter unlawful conduct, expect a couple of big cases against private equity execs.
  5. FINRA will bring actions against firms for hiring bad brokers.  Rather than simply prosecute the brokers, FINRA will dedicate some enforcement resources to firms that fail to screen out the bad brokers, thereby making it a firm responsibility.
  6. SEC and/or FINRA will bring cases alleging inadequate branch office supervision.  Both regulators have expressed concerns about remote office supervision.  Enforcement cases will ensure the industry’s attention.
  7. The SEC will commence significant marketing/advertising cases.  Seemingly out-of-the-blue, the SEC warned advisers about misleading marketing and advertising claims.  We are assuming that OCIE is uncovering a lot of problems.
  8. The SEC will propose a re-write of the custody rule.  The custody rule has the right intent, but the rule itself is too open to interpretation and questions (see multiple FAQs).  We think the Division of Investment Management will undertake a re-write (although maybe this is just wishful thinking.)
  9. The SEC will propose cryptocurrency regulations.  Bitcoin futures are flying high.  The SEC has expressed its opinion that it should regulate cryptocurrency offerings.  We expect some rules.
  10. The SEC will re-propose the ETF rule.  Plain vanilla ETFs should have a rule that allows them to proceed without an exemptive order.  The SEC proposed and abandoned a rule several years ago.  We anticipate that the SEC will resuscitate the effort.

Adviser Inflated AUM and Touted Fake Returns

An investment adviser has been censured, fined, and barred from the industry for making misleading marketing representations.  The adviser used emails to claim inflated assets under management and tout a non-existent quantitative trading model and historical performance.  The adviser furthered his fraud by putting the fake product and returns on a hedge fund database that was accessed by potential investors.

OUR TAKE: The SEC has warned that it would bring cases against advisers for misleading marketing claims.  Firms should also note that the use of third party databases constitutes marketing subject to the Advisers Act’s anti-fraud rules.

https://www.sec.gov/litigation/complaints/2017/comp23808.pdf

Dual-Hat Principal/CCO Ignored SEC’s Compliance Deficiencies

The SEC has commenced enforcement proceedings against a fund manager and its principal/CCO for ignoring exam deficiencies about its compliance program and other violations.  The SEC examined the respondents in 2010 and 2014 and noted several compliance deficiencies, which the SEC asserts the respondents ignored.  The SEC charges the dual-hatted principal with failing to perform any work on the compliance program, adopting a stock manual that was not properly tailored to the business, or conducting any compliance review.  The SEC also faults the respondents for charging compliance costs to the funds.  The SEC additionally charges undisclosed conflicts of interest, misrepresentations, and valuation issues.

OUR TAKE: The SEC doesn’t always give you a second chance to fix cited deficiencies.  But when they do and you don’t, expect an enforcement action.  Also, this is another example of the failure of the dual-hatted CCO model, where an executive ignored his compliance responsibilities.  Penny wise and pound foolish.

https://www.sec.gov/litigation/complaints/2017/comp24011.pdf

Top 5 Regulatory Alerts – October-November 2017

 

Here are our Top 5 Regulatory Alerts for October-November 2017, ranked by significance.  We have also included the Top 5 most read Alerts (other than Best of the Web and Top 5).

 

Top 5 Regulatory Alerts – October-November 2017

  1. SEC ENFORCEMENT DIVISION TARGETS FINANCIAL EXECUTIVES (11/17/17)
  2. PRIVATE COMPANY AND CEO MISLED INVESTORS ABOUT COMPLIANCE FAILURES (11/3/17)
  3. CONSULTANT TO PE PORTFOLIO COMPANY CHARGED WITH INSIDER TRADING (11/16/17)
  4. OPERATIONS MANAGER CHARGED WITH AIDING/ABETTING SECURITIES FRAUD (10/10/17)
  5. LARGE BD FINED $3.5 MILLION FOR CURTAILING SAR FILINGS (11/14/17)

 

Most Read – October-November 2017

  1. SEC CHARGES LAWYERS FOR CLIENTS’ SECURITIES FRAUD (10/17/17)
  2. SEC DEEMS THIRD PARTY VALUATION AGENT AN “INVESTMENT ADVISER” (10/2/17)
  3. SEC TO CREATE WEBSITE OF BAD ACTORS (11/9/17)
  4. LARGE BD FINED $3.5 MILLION FOR CURTAILING SAR FILINGS (11/14/17)
  5. CHIEF ACCOUNTING OFFICER BARRED AND FINED FOR APPROVING CEO EXPENSES (11/20/17)

RIA/BD Failed to Disclose Mark-Ups and 12b-1 Fees

The SEC has commenced enforcement proceedings against a dually registered adviser/broker-dealer and its CEO/CCO principal for taking undisclosed commissions and 12b-1 fees on discretionary accounts.  The SEC’s complaint avers that the respondent sold inventory securities, acquired at a discount as part of the selling syndicate, to clients at a mark-up.  The SEC alleges that the firm never obtained the required informed consent.  The SEC also charges the firm for taking mutual fund 12b-1 fees without telling clients.

OUR TAKE:  A principal transaction with a client requires an adviser fiduciary to obtain specific client consent following disclosure of all relevant information.  The SEC continues its crackdown on any form of revenue sharing received by advisers with respect to their fiduciary clients.

https://www.sec.gov/litigation/complaints/2017/comp24007.pdf

IA/BD Failed to Supervise Its CEO/CCO

 The SEC fined and censured an IA/BD for failing to supervise its CEO/CCO who was ultimately criminally convicted of stealing from clients.  The CEO/CCO used the firm’s consolidated reporting system, which allowed manual inputs of outside investments, as a way to mislead clients about false investments that he siphoned off into his own account.  The SEC faults the firm for failing to implement reasonable policies and procedures to review the consolidated reports, which, according to the SEC, would have quickly uncovered the obvious scheme.  The SEC charges violations of the antifraud rules and the compliance rule (206(4)-7), which requires firms to adopt and implement reasonable compliance policies procedures to prevent violations of the securities laws.

OUR TAKE: It’s never good when the CEO (or any other revenue-producing individual) also serves as the CCO.  Such a structure virtually ensures a lack of proper supervision.  Firms must ensure that the CCO, whether inside or outsourced, has significant independence from management and the revenue-producing function.  The SEC has brought several enforcement actions against dual-hatted CCOs, who also serve in a management capacity.

https://www.sec.gov/litigation/admin/2017/34-82282.pdf

Three Firms Fined for Marketing Hypothetical Third Party Performance

The SEC censured and fined three more investment advisers in connection with marketing F-Squared’s misleading hypothetical performance information.  One of the firms agreed to pay $8.75 Million in disgorgement, fines, interest and another agreed to pay over $700,000, while the third firm, which has ceased its business, agreed to pay a $200,000 fine.  The SEC alleges that the firms incorporated misleading F-Squared-provided performance information into their marketing materials without conducting adequate due diligence into the performance claims, despite significant red flags such as hypothetical backtested performance, outlier returns, lack of actual performance history, and lack of data transparency. The SEC charged the firms with failing to implement adequate compliance policies and procedures to verify third party performance claims and maintain required records.  The defunct firm, which also sponsored a registered mutual fund, was also charged with several Investment Company Act violations including violations of Section 15, which requires a shareholder-approved written agreement with all sub-advisers.  The SEC has previously brought several cases related to incorporating misleading F-Squared performance (see http://cipperman.com/2016/08/29/sec-fines-13-advisers-for-failing-to-verify-third-partys-performance/).

OUR TAKE: Investment advisers must adopt and implement procedures to test performance claims made by third parties, and firms can’t claim ignorance and innocence if the third party refuses to provide backup data.  Also, we do not believe firms should ever use hypothetical backtested performance data, because the SEC usually alleges that such information is too misleading.

https://www.sec.gov/litigation/admin/2017/33-10443.pdf

https://www.sec.gov/litigation/admin/2017/34-82244.pdf

https://www.sec.gov/litigation/admin/2017/ia-4823.pdf