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Private Equity Exec Barred from Industry for Personal Transaction with Portfolio Company

 A private equity firm’s managing partner, who also served as its Chief Compliance Officer, was barred from the industry and fined for failing to disclose his personal interest in a portfolio company.  The SEC alleges that the respondent caused the fund to make a loan to the portfolio company on the condition that the company used a portion of the proceeds to redeem his investment.  The SEC faults the executive for failing to disclose the transaction or to obtain consent to it from the limited partnership committee.  Neither the fund nor the investors lost money because the portfolio company ultimately sold the notes to an unaffiliated third party.

OUR TAKE: Without proper disclosure and consent, a transaction that benefits the fund sponsor or its principals will violate the Advisers Act’s fiduciary duty whether or not the investors suffered any harm.  This case also highlights the perils of the CCO dual-hat model whereby a senior executive with a pecuniary interest also serves as the Chief Compliance Officer, thereby avoiding independent scrutiny.