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SEC Staff Suggests that Advisers Should Rebate Revenue Sharing

 

In a recent FAQ, the staff of the SEC’s Division of Investment Management suggests that investment advisers consider rebating revenue sharing received from third parties against account-level fees.  The FAQ purports to offer disclosure and mitigation guidance for advisers that receive payments or benefits from third parties for recommending certain classes of mutual funds.  The staff requires extensive disclosure including the share classes available, differences in expenses and performance, limitations on the availability of share classes, conversion practices, how the adviser recommends different share classes, and the existence of incentives.  The staff also encourages advisers to disclose “[w]hether the adviser has a practice of offsetting or rebating some or all of the additional costs to which a client is subject (such as 12b-1 fees and/or sales charges), the impact of such offsets or rebates, and whether that practice differs depending on the class of client, advice, or transaction” such as ERISA accounts.

We believe that, through these extensive disclosure requirements, the SEC staff is effectively outlawing revenue sharing unless the adviser rebates the compensation to clients.  Disclosure alone may never be sufficient for an adviser to satisfy its fiduciary obligations.  This standard would conform with how ERISA treats qualified accounts.